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Advances in Statistical Climatology, Meteorology and Oceanography An international open-access journal on applied statistics
Adv. Stat. Clim. Meteorol. Oceanogr., 3, 67-92, 2017
https://doi.org/10.5194/ascmo-3-67-2017
© Author(s) 2017. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 License.
 
14 Jul 2017
Assessing NARCCAP climate model effects using spatial confidence regions
Joshua P. French1, Seth McGinnis2, and Armin Schwartzman3 1Department of Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, University of Colorado Denver, Denver, CO 80204, USA
2Institute for Mathematics Applied to Geosciences, National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO 80307, USA
3Division of Biostatistics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
Abstract. We assess similarities and differences between model effects for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program (NARCCAP) climate models using varying classes of linear regression models. Specifically, we consider how the average temperature effect differs for the various global and regional climate model combinations, including assessment of possible interaction between the effects of global and regional climate models. We use both pointwise and simultaneous inference procedures to identify regions where global and regional climate model effects differ. We also show conclusively that results from pointwise inference are misleading, and that accounting for multiple comparisons is important for making proper inference.

Citation: French, J. P., McGinnis, S., and Schwartzman, A.: Assessing NARCCAP climate model effects using spatial confidence regions, Adv. Stat. Clim. Meteorol. Oceanogr., 3, 67-92, https://doi.org/10.5194/ascmo-3-67-2017, 2017.
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We assess the mean temperature effect of global and regional climate model combinations for the North American Regional Climate Change Assessment Program using varying classes of linear regression models, including possible interaction effects. We use both pointwise and simultaneous inference procedures to identify regions where global and regional climate model effects differ. We conclusively show that accounting for multiple comparisons is important for making proper inference.
We assess the mean temperature effect of global and regional climate model combinations for the...
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